Untitled
teairadanceordie:

Beautiful.!!! :-)

teairadanceordie:

Beautiful.!!! :-)

elhieroglyph:

The 99 Names of Allah Painting

elhieroglyph:

The 99 Names of Allah Painting

anthonyderosa:

Nieman Lab
The Big Soup : Anthony De Rosa on Becoming Reuters social media editor and the ambient wire for news
animalworld:

SUPERB STARLING
©al mawashhani
Cooperative Breeders:The Superb Starling has one of the most complicated and fascinating lifestyles of any bird species. It is a cooperative breeder, which means more than two individuals care for the young at a nest. Cooperative breeding occurs in less than 4% of all bird species. While the typical cooperative breeder lives in small family groups, the Superb Starling lives in large social groups with as many as 30 or more birds — often extended families of parents, step-parents, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, and nephews. Within these groups, usually two to four pairs build nests inside thorn-encased acacia trees. Both males and females may help raise the young of the breeding pairs. Although most of these helpers are aiding their own parents, they often help at multiple nests simultaneously.
Even other breeders have been known to help at nests that are not their own.
In Kenya, cooperative breeding occurs in numerous species of birds and even some mammals, such as hyenas and wild dogs. We are not really sure why cooperative breeding is so common there, but the answer may have something to do with the East African environment. For many months each year the savanna is dry and barren, and the timing and intensity of rain are quite variable from year to year. Without helpers to feed nestlings in times of food shortage and to protect them from the ever-present nest predators such as snakes, hawks, and small mammals, most pairs might rarely fledge young. And because groups consist of close relatives, individuals may be more willing to forgo breeding on their own to help raise the offspring of their kin instead.
—-
Fact Source:http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Publications/Birdscope/Spring2005/superb_starling.html

animalworld:

SUPERB STARLING

©al mawashhani

Cooperative Breeders:
The Superb Starling has one of the most complicated and fascinating lifestyles of any bird species. It is a cooperative breeder, which means more than two individuals care for the young at a nest. Cooperative breeding occurs in less than 4% of all bird species. While the typical cooperative breeder lives in small family groups, the Superb Starling lives in large social groups with as many as 30 or more birds — often extended families of parents, step-parents, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, and nephews. Within these groups, usually two to four pairs build nests inside thorn-encased acacia trees. Both males and females may help raise the young of the breeding pairs. Although most of these helpers are aiding their own parents, they often help at multiple nests simultaneously.

Even other breeders have been known to help at nests that are not their own.

In Kenya, cooperative breeding occurs in numerous species of birds and even some mammals, such as hyenas and wild dogs. We are not really sure why cooperative breeding is so common there, but the answer may have something to do with the East African environment. For many months each year the savanna is dry and barren, and the timing and intensity of rain are quite variable from year to year. Without helpers to feed nestlings in times of food shortage and to protect them from the ever-present nest predators such as snakes, hawks, and small mammals, most pairs might rarely fledge young. And because groups consist of close relatives, individuals may be more willing to forgo breeding on their own to help raise the offspring of their kin instead.

—-

Fact Source:
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Publications/Birdscope/Spring2005/superb_starling.html

animalworld:

SRI LANKA BLUE MAGPIE or CEYLON MAGPIE (Urocissa ornata) - ©Rainbirder
Sri Lanka blue magpie is a member of the crow family living in the hill forests of Sri Lanka, where it is endemic.
This is a species of a dense wet evergreen temperate rain forest.
 It is declining due to loss of this habitat.
Sri Lanka blue magpie is usually found in small groups of up to six or seven birds.
It is largely carnivorous, eating small frogs, lizards, insects and other invertebrates, but will eat fruit.
The Sri Lanka Blue Magpie is about the same size as the European Magpie at 42–47 cm. The adults are blue with chestnut head and wings, and a long white-tipped tail. The legs and bill are red. The young bird is a duller version of the adult.
The Sri Lanka Blue Magpie has a variety of calls including mimicry, a loud chink-chink and a rasping krak-krak-krak-krak.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Lanka_Blue_Magpie
Other photos you might enjoy:
Great Hornbill
India Blue Peafowl/Peacock
Oscellated Blue Turkey
—-
electricorchid:

the Sri Lanka blue magpie (Urocissa ornata) is a member of the crow family and can be found in the rain forests in the interior of the island | +

animalworld:

SRI LANKA BLUE MAGPIE or CEYLON MAGPIE (Urocissa ornata) - ©Rainbirder

  • Sri Lanka blue magpie is a member of the crow family living in the hill forests of Sri Lanka, where it is endemic.
  • This is a species of a dense wet evergreen temperate rain forest.
  •  It is declining due to loss of this habitat.
  • Sri Lanka blue magpie is usually found in small groups of up to six or seven birds.
  • It is largely carnivorous, eating small frogs, lizards, insects and other invertebrates, but will eat fruit.
  • The Sri Lanka Blue Magpie is about the same size as the European Magpie at 42–47 cm. The adults are blue with chestnut head and wings, and a long white-tipped tail. The legs and bill are red. The young bird is a duller version of the adult.
  • The Sri Lanka Blue Magpie has a variety of calls including mimicry, a loud chink-chink and a rasping krak-krak-krak-krak.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Lanka_Blue_Magpie

Other photos you might enjoy:

Great Hornbill

India Blue Peafowl/Peacock

Oscellated Blue Turkey

—-

electricorchid:

the Sri Lanka blue magpie (Urocissa ornata) is a member of the crow family and can be found in the rain forests in the interior of the island | +

fuckyeahchunk:

This definitely need to be on here. This is the original Chunk spec poster, by the designer herself!
theleagueofmoveabletype:

Oh wow, I had no idea Meredith is on Tumblr. She’s the creator of Chunk! Did you know that?
And this was the poster that I saw during her senior show last year at Otis, the reason why we contacted her to be a contributor to The League.
meredithmandel:

Chunk: This is the super-bold slab serif font I made. Right now it’s available to download on the League of Moveable Type, an awesome website started by fellow Otis alumns.Also, check it out featured on Smashing Magazine’s beautiful high-quality free fonts for your designs!
Still finishing up the font, stay on the lookout!

fuckyeahchunk:

This definitely need to be on here. This is the original Chunk spec poster, by the designer herself!

theleagueofmoveabletype:

Oh wow, I had no idea Meredith is on Tumblr. She’s the creator of Chunk! Did you know that?

And this was the poster that I saw during her senior show last year at Otis, the reason why we contacted her to be a contributor to The League.

meredithmandel:

Chunk: This is the super-bold slab serif font I made. Right now it’s available to download on the League of Moveable Type, an awesome website started by fellow Otis alumns.

Also, check it out featured on Smashing Magazine’s beautiful high-quality free fonts for your designs!

Still finishing up the font, stay on the lookout!

karenkavett:

John Green’s lawn

karenkavett:

John Green’s lawn

fuckyeahladygaga:

Lady Gaga went very method in her ‘drag performance’ as Jo Calderone at the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday night. An insider has confirmed to Us Weekly that the singer went so far as to wear a prosthetic penis under her suit.

Gaga remained in character all night, and insisted on speaking to the…